Vacation Bible School Album Soars to No. 1 on Apple Music Chart – Michael Foust

The soundtrack to a popular Vacation Bible School program climbed to No. 1 on an Apple Music chart last month.

Spark Studios, the album for Lifeway’s 2022 Vacation Bible School program, reached No. 1 in June on Apple Music’s Top 100 Children’s Music Albums chart, according to Baptist Press, and remains in the Top 5.

This year’s Lifeway VBS teaches children that “God’s creativity didn’t stop in Genesis,” Lifeway’s website says. The album was produced by Lifeway Kids Worship.

“The Master Artist is working to redeem, reclaim, and transform us – His creation – to the design He planned for us,” the Spark Studios website says. “Kids will see the beautiful truth that they are God’s workmanship as they learn to use their talents to bring glory to Him.”

The VBS theme verse is Ephesians 2:10, “For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared ahead of time for us to do” (CSB).

Lifeway’s VBS and kids ministry specialist Melita Thomas told Baptist Press it’s encouraging to see the album top the charts.

“With the pandemic negatively impacting many churches’ ability to do VBS the past two years, I think this is evidence that VBS is returning in full force across the country,” Thomas said. “We’re very proud of the role music plays in Lifeway’s VBS as it’s an intentional part of our strategy. You’ll find the daily Bible verses embedded in the daily songs, and the theme song often includes the theme verse in its entirety, which makes it easy for kids to memorize.”

The goal, Thomas said, is for children to “internalize those truths as they listen to and sing the words over and over again.”

“Music is such a powerful teaching tool, and it has a way of sticking with you long after VBS is over,” she added. “We want the truths of Scripture to be cemented deep in a child’s mind and heart so that they carry it with them for life. Music at VBS is not about learning and performing motions – it’s about getting the truth of God’s Word into the hearts and minds of children and their families.”

Photo courtesy: ©Lifeway, used with permission.

Michael Foust has covered the intersection of faith and news for 20 years. His stories have appeared in Baptist Press, Christianity Today, The Christian Post, the Leaf-Chroniclethe Toronto Star and the Knoxville News-Sentinel.

This content was originally published here.

Peter Andre ‘stepping back from music industry’ to make way for chart-topping son Junior – Mirror Online

Junior Andre reckons his dad Pete is ‘stepping back from the music industry’ after his son stormed the charts with his debut single.

The 16-year-old bagged the number one spot on iTunes with his smash hit Slide – 27 years after Pete’s Mysterious Girl.

The father-of-four, 49, is taking a hands on approach to Junior’s career with the teen revealing the Aussie is ready to make way for his protégé.

Recalling the moment Pete first introduced him to a recording studio, Junior said: “Me and my dad sort of looked at each other and he said, ‘It’s your time now, son’.

“I couldn’t stop smiling. It was the happiest I’d ever been. I feel like I found myself in life – this is what I want to do.

Image:

Instagram/ @peterandre)

“I go back to that day, and I remember I was so proud of myself, and my dad was so proud of me,” he told the Daily Star.

Slide stormed to the top of the charts within hours of its release, selling more than Harry Styles and Lady Gaga.

However despite his impressive success, Junior is still a teenager and says he still has rules to follow.

Describing the reality of releasing a record, he revealed: “I would sleep in a studio. Obviously, I’m not an adult yet so I have a curfew. But my dad knows how it gets, when you want to record more but you have to be home at a certain time.”

Doting dad Pete shared his excitement when Slide shot to number one, sharing snapshots of the iTunes chart with the caption: “What a start. Wow son. Let’s get him to number 1! Thanks everyone that’s downloading this for him.”

Image:

@officialjunior_andre/Instagram)

The teen’s mum Katie Price also congratulated her son, saying she was “so proud”, and uploaded screenshots of her listening to the track.

Junior performed Slide at a launch party, which was attended by his sister Princess.

A crowd of excited fans were serenaded by the star, who looked very much at home on stage.

But there was no-one more excited than doting dad Pete, who gushed: “You have no idea how proud I am of you tonight son.

“Born to do it.”

This content was originally published here.

DMC Dance Mixes Issue 306 Remix Chart Music DJ CD

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Spotify iceberg: How to get the latest viral music chart Icebergify

Three spotify iceberg results

How deep does the iceberg of your music taste go?

That’s the question everyone on my Instagram and Twitter appears to be trying to answer with a new way Spotify listeners can analyze their music. Icebergify is a tool that shows all of your favorite artists on Spotify in a chart that looks a lot like — you guessed it — an iceberg. It’s the latest viral Spotify tool following closely behind the Spotify Pie chart that picked up a lot of attention earlier this month.

What is the Spotify Icebergify?

Icebergify collects data from your top 50 artists in your short-term, medium-term, and long-term listening trends, according to Icebergify. So the artists on your chart might be musicians you haven’t listened to in a few months, or maybe are bands you’ve only just started listening to now.

It looks at those top artists and organizes them by their popularity or obscurity, and then pops them into an iceberg category. For instance, if you listen to a lot of Ed Sheeran, he’ll go into the top iceberg level because he’s one of the most popular artists out there. But if you listen to a lot of Antichrist Siege Machine, they’ll be closer to the bottom. If you don’t listen to any artists in a certain level of popularity, the level will just show up blank — so you might want to work on diversifying your music taste before you share.

How to get your Spotify Icebergify

Like most Spotify music analyzing tools, all you have to do is go to a website, give them some permissions to check out your Spotify account, and you’ve got an iceberg-shaped chart to share with your friends and enemies.

Go to Icebergify.com for this tool, but be warned — it took a few of us at Mashable a couple of tries before it worked. Just keep refreshing the site and it’ll eventually work. You might have to clear your cookies and site data and try a few more times. To save the image, screenshot it, hold down it on your phone, or right-click it on your laptop or PC.

By using this tool you will give the folks behind Icebergify your data, so if your streaming data is something you’d rather keep private for whatever reason, you may want to sit this out.

Who created Icebergify?

According to the Icebergify site, it was created by Akshay Raj in 2022. His name is linked out to a private Instagram.

This content was originally published here.

Lifeway’s ‘Spark Studios’ VBS Album Reaches No. 1 on Apple Music Album Chart

NASHVILLE (BP) – Lifeway’s 2022 Vacation Bible School soundtrack “Spark Studios,” reached the No. 1 spot on Apple Music’s Top 100 Children’s Music Albums chart last week.

The album reached the top spot on the chart during the week of the SBC annual meeting in Anaheim, Calif. In addition to reaching the top spot on the children’s chart, the record also reached the 63rd spot on the overall Apple Music Top 100 chart for all genres.

Released Dec. 3, 2021, the album features six tracks, including this year’s VBS theme song also titled “Spark Studios.” It remains in the top 20 on the Children’s Music Top 100 chart.

The theme song is based out of this year’s VBS theme verse of Ephesians 2:10, “For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared ahead of time for us to do” (CSB).

Melita Thomas, Lifeway’s VBS and kids ministry specialist, said the success of the album is a welcome and encouraging sign for kids ministry in the SBC.

“With the pandemic negatively impacting many churches’ ability to do VBS the past two years, I think this is evidence that VBS is returning in full force across the country,” Thomas said.

“We’re very proud of the role music plays in Lifeway’s VBS as it’s an intentional part of our strategy. You’ll find the daily Bible verses embedded in the daily songs and the theme song often includes the theme verse in its entirety, which makes it easy for kids to memorize.

“More than just memorization, we want kids to internalize those truths as they listen to and sing the words over and over again. Music is such a powerful teaching tool and it has a way of sticking with you long after VBS is over. We want the truths of Scripture to be cemented deep in a child’s mind and heart so that they carry it with them for life. Music at VBS is not about learning and performing motions – it’s about getting the truth of God’s Word into the hearts and minds of children and their families.”

This is not the first time Lifeway’s VBS album has achieved chart-topping success. Previous VBS albums have frequently ranked in the top 20 in the Kids category on Billboard charts.

Paul Marino and Jeremy Johnson helped write and produce this year’s album for Lifeway. They work as independent contractors with Lifeway to help create VBS music in partnership with Lifeway Kids.

Marino told Baptist Press the goal of music at VBS is to get the biblical principles taught throughout the week to stick in kids’ hearts and minds.

“It’s a real honor to write this and to use if for God’s kingdom,” Marino said. “Music helps people memorize things, and melodies can stick in your head, sometimes for your whole life.

“Our challenge is to take the overall theme and what they want to say with the theme, and put music to it with lyrics that rhyme and work with the Scripture verses. We try to put it all together so it’s one cohesive album, and from the beginning to end it takes you on a journey through the week of the VBS. This year’s theme is different from many other years of our theme songs, but it gives it a new freshness and the kids really grabbed onto it.”

Marino said a highlight for him is seeing the music performed by kids in various live settings.

This content was originally published here.

Renowned pop music chart historian, and Menomonee Falls native, Joel Whitburn has died

Jim Higgins
 

| Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Here’s an example of the clout of pop music chart historian Joel Whitburn.

When he met Elton John, Whitburn told a Billboard podcast interviewer in 2016, he tried to give the famous singer one of his books. 

“Oh, I got all your stuff, Joel,” Sir Elton replied.

Whitburn, who grew up in Menomonee Falls, turned his passion for music and fascination with the Billboard charts into a research and publishing behemoth that served music industry professionals and fans alike with books of organized data and trivia. If you wanted to know how many hits Elton John or Beyoncé or Bon Iver had, Whitburn was your guy. 

He “passed away peacefully overnight” on June 14, following serious recent health issues, his friend and employee Paul Haney reported. Whitburn was 82. 

As a youth, Whitburn began reading Billboard, the music and entertainment industry trade magazine. In particular, he was fascinated with Billboard’s weekly charts of the most popular records. 

“I was at the perfect age, 14 or 15, when rock and roll broke,” he told interviewer Larry LeBlanc in a 2009 interview, describing his youthful passion for music. “I was able to go down once a week and buy a record. I had to make that awful decision of what record do I buy this week, and what records do I leave out until next week.”  

Decades before the internet, spreadsheets and personal computers, Whitburn kept track of each week’s top recordings. When Billboard launched its Hot 100 chart in 1958, he began, in those days before personal computers, logging detailed info about every listed song on 3-by-5-inch index cards. 

Working in record distribution for RCA in the 1960s, Whitburn impressed radio staffers with the information he had. “They all said it would be a godsend to have that information at their fingertips, because there was nothing available,” he told Billboard in an interview.

Seeing the opportunity, he quit his RCA job, founded Record Research in Menomonee Falls, and published his first book “Top Pop Records,” in 1970. That book evolved into “Top Pop Singles,” the flagship publication of Record Research, Haney said. 

He was no one-hit wonder. Counting successive editions of works such as “Top Pop Singles,” Whitburn and Record Research are believed to have published nearly 300 books. Whitburn also tapped his chart knowledge to produce some 150 “Billboard Top Hits” compilation CDs for Rhino Records. 

His careful compilation of chart data made his work go-to references — and stymied charlatans. 

“His accurate reporting also made it more difficult for publicists and labels to credibly fudge the chart achievements of their artists, a notoriously common practice in the early ’70s,” Andrew Unterberger wrote in a Billboard obituary article.

Whitburn’s personal music collection, stored at his home, added up to 200,000 singles, albums and CDs, Haney confirmed. That collection includes every record ever listed in the Billboard Hot 100, and every record listed in rival and defunct charts.

In a 2014 interview with the Journal Sentinel, he said that he used his collection as a primary source of accurate information on things like label names and B-sides.

At 6 feet 6 inches tall, Whitburn played basketball for Menomonee Falls High School as well as Elmhurt College in Illinois. He also attended the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee for a time.  

Whitburn was inducted into the Menomonee Falls High School Fine Arts Hall of Fame in 2015. He was also a voting member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Whitburn’s daughter Kim Bloxdorf, a vice president at Record Research, will continue running the company. Haney, an editor and researcher there for 30 years, and Brent Olynick, who’s worked there for more than four decades, will assist her, Haney said. 

Whitburn was an easy boss who trusted employees to get the job done, Haney said. But he was also passionate about detail and a stickler for accuracy.

“If I didn’t get something exactly correct, I would hear about it,” Haney added.

Some of Haney’s favorite memories are of sitting in Whitburn’s office for half an hour or hour, talking about charts and music. 

“He was really like a father figure to me,” he said.

Whitburn’s survivors include his wife of 58 years, Frances; his daughter Kim; his sisters, Joyce Riehl and Julie Rae Niermeyer; his brothers, Charles and David; two grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. 

Visitation will begin at 1 p.m. June 24 at Northbrook Church, 4014 WI-167, Richfield, with service at 3 p.m.

Contact Jim Higgins at jim.higgins@jrn.com. Follow him on Twitter at @jhiggy.

Our subscribers make this reporting possible. Please consider supporting local journalism by subscribing to the Journal Sentinel at jsonline.com/deal.

This content was originally published here.

Pioneering pop music chart analyst Joel Whitburn dies at 82 – ABC News

NEW YORK — Joel Whitburn, who turned his fascination with the Billboard charts into a career cataloging the history of charted music that kept gatekeepers honest about the performance of hits, has died. He was 82.

His Tuesday death at his home in Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin, was announced by Record Research, Whitburn’s publishing company. Employee Paul Haney posted on Facebook that he died “peacefully overnight.”

Whitburn published hundreds of books, including many in entries of series like “Top Pop Singles,” “Top 40 Hits,” “Top 40 Albums” and “Top 40 Country Hits,” helping the whole industry with reliable chart stats and records. His books were crucial to DJs, publicists and chart nerds.

“Joel Whitburn was a titan in our field,” wrote Chris Molanphy, a Slate chart analyst and host of the podcast “Hit Parade,” on Twitter. “If there is an afterworld, Joel is on top of a list at the pearly gates — No. 1 with a bullet and a star. R.I.P.”

When the Billboard Hot 100 make its bow in 1958, Whitburn made index cards cataloguing all the relevant information of the songs listed, tracking their movement on the chart from week to week.

He kept it up even after getting a job at RCA doing record distribution in the mid ’60 and then decided to devote himself full-time to his research, founding Record Research and publishing his findings in the company’s first release, “Top Pop Singles in 1970.”

Whitburn had a licensing agreement with Billboard to publish his work and paid the magazine a royalty. “Billboard could not have asked for a better representative to document the history of our charts than Joel Whitburn,” said Silvio Pietroluongo, Billboard‘s SVP of Charts & Data Development.

Whitburn also was a collector and kept 150,000 singles, albums and CDs, including every record ever listed in the Billboard Hot 100. He is survived by his wife, Fran, and their daughter, Kim Bloxdorf.

Mark Kennedy is at http://twitter.com/KennedyTwits

This content was originally published here.

Pioneering pop music chart analyst Joel Whitburn dies at 82

NEW YORK (AP) — Joel Whitburn, who turned his fascination with the Billboard charts into a career cataloging the history of charted music that kept gatekeepers honest about the performance of hits, has died. He was 82.

His Tuesday death at his home in Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin, was announced by Record Research, Whitburn’s publishing company. Employee Paul Haney posted on Facebook that he died “peacefully overnight.”

Whitburn published hundreds of books, including many in entries of series like “Top Pop Singles,” “Top 40 Hits,” “Top 40 Albums” and “Top 40 Country Hits,” helping the whole industry with reliable chart stats and records. His books were crucial to DJs, publicists and chart nerds.

“Joel Whitburn was a titan in our field,” wrote Chris Molanphy, a Slate chart analyst and host of the podcast “Hit Parade,” on Twitter. “If there is an afterworld, Joel is on top of a list at the pearly gates — No. 1 with a bullet and a star. R.I.P.”

When the Billboard Hot 100 make its bow in 1958, Whitburn made index cards cataloguing all the relevant information of the songs listed, tracking their movement on the chart from week to week.

He kept it up even after getting a job at RCA doing record distribution in the mid ’60 and then decided to devote himself full-time to his research, founding Record Research and publishing his findings in the company’s first release, “Top Pop Singles in 1970.”

Whitburn had a licensing agreement with Billboard to publish his work and paid the magazine a royalty. “Billboard could not have asked for a better representative to document the history of our charts than Joel Whitburn,” said Silvio Pietroluongo, Billboard‘s SVP of Charts & Data Development.

Whitburn also was a collector and kept 150,000 singles, albums and CDs, including every record ever listed in the Billboard Hot 100. He is survived by his wife, Fran, and their daughter, Kim Bloxdorf.

___

Mark Kennedy is at http://twitter.com/KennedyTwits

By MARK KENNEDY
AP Entertainment Writer

This content was originally published here.

Adom Music Chart: Camidoh, Shatta Wale and Black Sherif top list in Week 22 – MyJoyOnline.com

Ghanaian singer Camidoh is definitely having an awesome year especially since his hit song, Sugarcane, has been crossing borders globally.

Since the song got released and started topping the airwaves, Camidoh has found a way to re-live it in the trends. The remix featuring King Promise, Nigeria’s Mayorkun and Darkoo has pushed the mileage of the song further.

Currently, his acoustic edition is steadily garnering the momentum to keep the song above others in many DJs’ playlists.

On Adom FM’s Music Chart Show Week 22, Sugarcane is still leading the pack. Last week it was at number 2; followed closely by Black Sherif’s Kwaku The Traveller song.

This week, Shatta Wale’s spiritual tune, ‘On God’, is at number 2. The song motivates people to look up to God in their daily happenings.

It remained number one for days when it got released on YouTube, even at the time Black Sherif was all over with his Kwaku The Traveller song.

Black Sherif came through at number 3 this week on the Adom Music Chart list. Kwaku The Traveller, per stats, is set to trend for a longer time in Ghana’s music space.

One of the musicians who are seriously championing the Afrobeats agenda is Kelvyn Boy. He is equally having a great year following the release of Down Flat.

The song he wrote in less than 10 mins has found its way to even the Billboard Charts. It was number 4 this week on Adom FM’s Chart show.

Stonebwoy released Therapy as his first single under the Def Jam record label, one of the highly reputed music labels in the world. The RnB, Reggae, Highlife and even the Dancehall genre could be felt in the ‘therapeutic’ single. Stonebwoy stays at number 5 this week.

King Promise’s Chop Life, featuring Patoranking is at number 6 this week.

Gospel musician Perez Musik is at number 7 this week on the Adom FM music chart with his Hewale Lala song.

Championing Highlife, Kuami Eugene clocks number 8 this week with his Take Away song. With only the visualizer released on YouTube, Kuami is garnering close to a million views.

Adina is currently at number 9 with ‘Hallelujah’.

Kofi Kinaata has his Have Mercy song at number 10 this week.

Highlife musician Akwaboah took the number 11 spot with Wo Pɛ W’adiɛ.

Fameye comes through at number 12 with his Everything Now song featuring Kwesi Arthur. The song is off his latest music project dubbed Songs of Peter.

King Promise got the number 13 slot this week on Adom FM music chart with his Ginger song.

Rapper Smallgod attained the number 14 slot with his Falling song, which features KiDi and Darkoo.

The Tema-based rapper Kwesi Arthur came through at number 15 with his Disturb song, off his Song of Jacob album.

Gospel musician Joyce Blessing got the 16th slot on the chart with Trending.

The Slayer in Christ, Evangelist Diana Asamoah, was number 17 on the Chart with her Mesom Ewurade.

Rapper Eno Barony continues to wow fans with her rapping prowess. Her latest, The Finish Line, featuring Amerado got fans weighing in on “who ‘murdered’ who”. It is at number 18 this week.

Kwabena Kwabena’s Fingers had the number 19 slot this week.

Criss Waddle’s Take Me Back featuring Stonebwoy made a debut at number 20 in week 22.

This content was originally published here.

Kate Bush had the biggest record in the UK last week, but she’s not No.1 on the Official Chart. This is a watershed moment for a music industry struggling to understand the meaning of ‘new’. – Music Business Worldwide

MBW Reacts is a series of short comment pieces from the MBW team. They are our ‘quick take’ reactions – through a music biz lens – to major entertainment news stories.

Labels are obsessing over it. Artists can’t live without it. If you’re not on it, and if you’re not going viral on it? You, chump, are out of the game.

But what’s this?

Here comes creaky old Netflix – with its knackered knees, its arthritic hips, and its 70%-down-YTD share price – to flip the entire music business on its head, and remind us that, actually, no one in this industry can predict anything anymore.

And that no one, not even TikTok, is ever fully in control of what makes a hit, a hit.

If you’ve been living under a boulder for the past couple of weeks – or are one just of the 2 million people Netflix is expecting to unsubscribe from its service in Q2 2022 – allow us to explain.

On May 27, the fourth series of Netflix-exclusive sci-fi drama, Stranger Things, premiered on the platform.

Kate Bush’s Running Up That Hill (A Deal With God) was featured in a climactic scene that has wowed the series’ global fanbase.

(We’d post the official video of that scene here, but it’s a bit scary – as in ‘horror themes’ scary – so we won’t. But if you’re made of stern stuff you can watch it on the official Netflix YouTube channel, where it already has over 5 million plays.)

Just look at what’s happened on Spotify since Stranger Things’ return:

What you see above are chart-eligible Spotify streams, which – as MBW understands it – discount anything over 10 plays per user per day. So Kate Bush’s actual global daily streams would be bigger than the figures in our chart, probably topping 9 million at their peak.

The big takeaway:

Fuelled by virality due to its inclusion in a blockbuster Netflix drama, Kate Bush’s Running Up That Hill  – 37 years (!) after it was released – was the No.1 most popular track in the world on Spotify over the last chart week (the seven days to EOP Thurs, June 9).

It beat massive pop hits from the likes of Harry Styles, Bad Bunny, Karol G, and Lizzo to this crown.

Yet if you looked at the UK’s latest weekly Official Singles Chart, which runs across the same chart week, you’d get a very different impression.

In the UK – Kate Bush’s home nation – Running Up That Hill was announced to have reached No.2 on the Official Chart on Friday (June 10), behind Harry Styles’ As It Was.

Here’s the shocker: MBW has confirmed with multiple label sources that Running Up That Hill actually beat As It Was last week in terms of both UK streams and UK downloads – and it wasn’t even close.

In fact, in terms of weekly UK streams, we’re told Running Up That Hill racked up more than 9 million plays across various platforms in its last chart week (again, to end of Thurs, June 9).

Our label sources tell us that this figure was comfortably over 2.5 million streams ahead of Harry Styles’ latest hit (which is now celebrating a tenth week at No.1 in the UK).

“MBW has confirmed with multiple label sources that Running Up That Hill actually beat As It Was last week in terms of both UK streams and UK downloads – and it wasn’t even close.”

In fact, MBW has confirmed that Running Up That Hill just had a bigger UK chart week than As It Was in terms of all of the following: (a) Premium streaming; (b) Ad-funded streaming; (c) Premium video streaming; and (d) Downloads.

Why that’s important: Each of these categories are the only formats that contribute to the Official UK Singles Chart.

So how on earth did Kate Bush end up losing out on a UK No.1 single for Running Up That Hill – which previously peaked at No.3 back in the mid-eighties?

It’s all because of a formula used by the Official Charts Company called Accelerated Chart Ratio (ACR).

In short, this formula is designed to make it harder for tracks that have already had a successful run on the UK chart from duking it out with newer releases.

ACR, which was first introduced in 2017, serves a specific purpose: To keep new entries flowing on to the chart each week, and to ensure that emerging British talent gets a leg-up against global hits that otherwise wouldn’t leave the Top 10 for months.

Because Running Up That Hill has already had a crack at the UK chart (albeit over 30 years ago), it is being punished with an ACR penalty, while young Harry’s latest bop avoids such fate (for now).

“Kate Bush’s track had to attract double the streams of Harry Styles’ track to earn the same ‘sale’ units that contribute to the UK weekly chart.”

As a result: Running Up That Hill’s premium streams on the UK chart this week were worth one ‘sale’ for every 200 plays; its ad-funded streams were worth one ‘sale’ for every 1,200 plays.

In contrast, As It Was earned one ‘sale’ for every 100 premium streams, and one ‘sale’ for every 600 ad-funded streams.

In other words, Kate Bush’s track had to attract double the streams of Harry Styles’ track to earn the same ‘sale’ units that contribute to the UK weekly chart.

And if you think that sounds like utter madness, well, that’s because it is.

It’s easy to blame the UK charts arbiter – the Official Charts Company (OCC) – for this ridiculousness, but it’s an org co-owned and directed by the UK’s biggest record labels.

The OCC is ultimately following the whims of the record business. Therefore, the record business needs to have a word with itself.

Five years ago, the OCC introduced ACR as a bulwark against the charts getting too boring.

This was a time when, thanks to young people rinsing tracks on streaming services, the likes of Drake and – particularly – Ed Sheeran were dominating the British chart to a laughable degree.

ACR was an understandable if debatable adjustment – a bid to protect a key artist marketing platform for record companies (i.e. a dynamic, don’t-miss weekly Official Chart).

Half a decade on, times have changed again.

Today’s global music business is rapidly coming to terms with another new era, where catalog tracks – especially proven evergreen tracks – can explode in streaming popularity with a young audience via a single, epoch-grabbing moment in wider media.

Recent examples include Nirvana’s Something In The Way recurrently appearing in the The Batman movie, propelling the track to chart on the Billboard Hot 100 for the first time, 31 years after it was released.

And, of course, there was last year’s big catalog viral smash – Fleetwood Mac’s Dreams –  which racked up over 36 million global audio streams in the fortnight after it became a TikTok sensation via a skateboarding man and a bottle of cranberry juice.

(To further reiterate the extraordinary scale of the Stranger Things sync: Running Up That Hill did 57 million global chart streams on Spotify in the past week alone.)

Obviously, the Official Charts Company must now quickly review its ARC suppression formula, which: (i) Just robbed Kate Bush of a rightful No.1 record; and (ii) Doesn’t seem fit for purpose in this here-comes-another-catalog-sync-smash era.

Yet all of this is arguably symptomatic of a wider problem: a record industry whose all-consuming obsession with new and youthful artists hasn’t yet quite been fully re-calibrated for catalog’s power in the streaming age.

‘New’ music remains the lifeblood of the record business, and it’s apt that the majority of record label investment and energy continues to head in the direction of frontline A&R, and new signings.

But perhaps the Kate Bush / Stranger Things story – especially the associated UK chart debacle – tells us that more focus, more resource, and frankly more thought should also now be pushed in the direction of established artists, with established songs.

There is an old adage that junior journalists are taught when they first make it to a professional news desk: News is simply something true that people don’t know yet.

The purpose of the maxim is to remind whippersnapper scribes that just because an event might have happened a few decades ago, they shouldn’t discount its relevance to modern-day reader.

News doesn’t have to be new; it just has to be new to your audience.

It’s high time the music industry heeded this advice.

Millions of teenagers would have started watching Stranger Things when it first aired back in 2016. Millions more will have joined their ranks as the years, and the seasons, have rolled on.

One wonders how many of these millions of young people have just heard Running Up That Hill for the very first time.

They do not come with the baggage of history; they do not come with a pre-disposed idea of who Kate Bush is, or how they may or may not relate to her.

They just hear a timeless tune, that moves them to press play (and, evidently, save) on Spotify.

How the music industry now capitalizes on this moment – and, indeed, publicly celebrates one of its all-time great artists as a result – will speak volumes.

Modern record label A&R executives are often keen to remind you how, in the streaming age, “global hits can come from anywhere“.

They might be referring to Brazil, or Korea, or Finland, or Nigeria, or any other region where a young person is currently cooking up a banger in Ableton. And that’s a wonderful thing.

But, as Kate Bush has proven, “anywhere” isn’t just geographical – it’s chronological, too.

It’s the year 1985.

For a hit-making music industry so determined to face forwards, this might sound like a far-off, scary place – perhaps even scarier than the Upside Down.

But oh, there is thunder in its heart.Music Business Worldwide

This content was originally published here.